Tag Archives: book

City of Bones by Cassandra Clare

One thing I always liked about City of Bones is how it emphasized knowledge and how it changes you. In the end of the movie, Clary tells Jace that everything’s change. She can’t see the world as the same anymore. When Jace replied, my heart stopped. It was the most amazing answer ever. He said, “The world hasn’t changed, you have.” That is so true.

A lot of the time we learn things about ourselves and others that change the way we see something. When you find out your significant other cheated on you, your heart breaks. You lose trust and sometimes can’t even look at them. In that moment they didn’t change. You did. When we see someone help an old lady cross a street, or someone buy a homeless man food, the same thing can be said. We view it as, “There are still good people in the world.” However, images of kidnappings, murders, thieves, and hate hit us.

We can go from feeling hopeful for the human race to feeling like we shouldn’t exist. Again, the world didn’t change, you did. Those things will always be there. Lies, cheating, murder, hate, love, joy, peace, and war are a part of this world. People change, but the world never does. Our whole world revolves around us and the way we view things. Racism, sexism, stereotyping, etc. It won’t ever go anywhere, but we do. We grow, learn, teach, accept, and won’t tolerate. It’s a part of who we are.

Clary is a fifteen (almost sixteen) year old girl that lives her life normally. She goes to school, comes home, hangs out with her best friend, and loves her mother. There isn’t anything really exciting about her life. Except for the nights that she’s able to visit a club called Pandemonium. Clary loves this place for the clothes, people, and atmosphere. Of course, her best friend, Simon, can’t stand it. He’s more of a nerdy, awkward guy that only tags along because it’s what Clary wants to do.

Then she witnesses a murder there. The worse part is that no one else sees it. Not because no one else is there, but because no one else saw the three teenagers lead a guy into a backroom. They’re completely invisible! But why can Clary see them? Because she’s hiding a secret. The only bad part about it is that she doesn’t even know what the secret is. Now realizing that the stories she was told as a kid about monsters and heroes were real, consumes her. And the dark shadowhunter that caused a bloody battle is leading straight to her. Who is she really and why can’t she remember?

I was in high school when I read this series for the first time. I couldn’t stop flipping pages. The most frustrating part was that I could only read so fast. I fell in love with each character for a different reason and felt real empathy for everything they went through. That had never happened to me before. This series has definitely earned its title as my favorite book series.

I also like the Christian background that it has involving angels and demons. In this world, they are physical beings that have to be fought in a war. In real life, they aren’t physical beings. We have to fight our demons spiritually. I liked how Cassandra brought that aspect of our lives into a physical form.

My favorite characters are Alec and Magnus. It’s not because they fall in love and I think it’s cute. I like them because of how witty they are. Magnus is supposed to be this crazy powerful warlock (which he is) and he is a giant teddy bear. He’s sweet and kind. Being willing to help a shadowhunter isn’t something most “Downworlders” (werewolves, vampires, warlocks) are capable of. Alec is a sweet guy as well. He is kind (except when he realizes there’s something between Clary and Jace) and considerate. At first, he’s made out to be a total douche. I’m not saying that he wasn’t one, but he had his reasons. I don’t take him as being someone that likes change.

Alec has a secret of his own. It’s life changing and scary. HIs world doesn’t accept this kind of secret. I feel like we all have secrets and life changing things about us that we’re afraid to let out into the world. Plus, once it’s out you can’t ever go back.

Would I recommend this book series? If it wasn’t obvious already, yes. I totally would.

Image via fandomnews.wordpress.com

The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde

In this book, Thursday Next, is a literary detective that investigates missing and stolen pieces of literature. When someone steals Martin Chuzzlewit, the original manuscript by Charles Dickens, Thursday finds herself stuck in a deadly investigation unlike any she has ever had before. Thursday Next encounters many things in this altered reality including seeing her future self and experiencing a portal that her uncle invented that allows someone to open a doorway into literature.

I ended up not reading the book to the end, which really upsets me because I wanted to like it so bad. It was good, but not enough that I wanted to read it until it was over. I really liked the altered reality and how it was different from what I heard the ’80s was like. (Spoiler Alert) I also liked how in this reality Jane didn’t see Mr. Rochester at the end of Jane Eyre, so she changed the ending while she was in the story.

I may try to read it again at a different time because the concept is awesome and I’d like to make it through the whole book.

What Happened To Goodbye?

After witnessing her parent’s awful divorce, her mother’s union with a new husband, and the news of twins being born into the family, Mclean Sweet decided to uproot herself and tag along with her father while he works. With this decision brings the chaos of never knowing where they would live and how long they’d be there, and for Mclean, who she would be. Mclean is a girl who pretends that she is a different person as she moves from city to city. But now, in Lakeview, all of this is about to change as she struggles to decide who she will be, and when she meets Dave, is being someone else what she really wants? Dave is sure that who he is falling in love with is the real her, as well as all the friend’s she has made, but are they really? For someone who has pretended for so long, does she even know who she is anymore?

My favorite parts in this book were the ones that had Dave. Not because of the fact that I was totally in love with him, but because when he was around it seemed as though Mclean had a grasp on life and who she was. She could be herself without Beth or Liz or Eliza and Lizbet. I also loved watching her transition from the person she thought she was to who she became, and with that, she learned more about her family and what life could really be like for her.

I strongly suggest this book to teenagers since it is about how finding who you are and being yourself is important. I also suggest it to anyone who likes a good, simple romance but wants to see the sweet transition leading up to it instead of all the passion. It was pretty incredible, in my opinion, and I would totally read it again!