Category Archives: Poetry Night Sundays

Poetry Night Sundays: The Truth Behind the Words

I’ve always wondered why I’d see memes or listened to songs that seemed to fit my every need. It was as if I couldn’t find the words to express what I was feeling until I saw them. The amount of relief that came to my head during a breakup or relationship problems, even work related, was tremendously helpful. When I discovered poets like Rupi Kaur and Amanda Lovelace, it was like a whole new world opened and allowed me to describe everything I was feeling to other people, to myself, and in my writing. I only hope that I’m that person for others in their journey through life. This week’s poem is called The Truth Behind the Words.

The Truth Behind the Words

We all want words we can relate to.
But why?

Is it because they bring reassurance that we’re not alone in our situation?
Or maybe because we can’t always find the right things to say until we see them.

There’s a sort of therapeutic significance to reading something that says exactly what we’re feeling.
I know that the reason it makes me feel better is that there’s a level of honesty in those words.

That we don’t find in our hearts.
That we can’t say out loud.
But when the words hit us,
So does the truth
And that’s what sets us free
From the feeling of not being able to express ourselves.

Picture Via Imgrum.org

Poetry Night Sunday: Who Are They To You?

Recently, my attention turned to this topic. Many people in my life have told me about their own suffering from the mental and emotional abuse they’ve experienced. I know what that’s like because it’s no secret of what I’ve gone through in my life. Humans just want to be loved, appreciated, and felt cared for. When someone we don’t know hurts us, it’s disappointing. However, when someone we love hurts us we can shatter.

The problem is that they don’t always know they’re hurting us, and sometimes they won’t know for a while. Mainly because we’re so scared of hurting them we won’t tell them about the hurt that we’re suffering. These people will tell us how worthless we are and how we can’t do anything right. Sometimes they use those exact words, but other times they dance around them. Other times it’s a slower type of abuse that we don’t notice at first. Eventually, it takes our minds over and before we know it, we’re something that’s broken.

For some, we self-destruct. Believing those things causes us to continue to hurt ourselves and the ones around us because that’s “All we’re good for.” People never realize they’re so much better than that. I’ve had the unfortunate circumstance of heartbreak recently. Someone I loved so deeply hurt me and I’m still in the process forgiveness and trying to get through the day without crying.

I am glad to say that I didn’t self-destruct this time. I think it’s because I had finally found something to live for and someone to care about. Even though I was hurt, I’m incapable of being mad at the person. I won’t lie, it’s frustrating because I want to be. I know I should, but I can’t.

I’m putting two poems up tonight. I wrote them in the last couple of days. It’s the lessons that I’ve learned through my experiences, faith, and prayer that have gotten me through even my darkest moments. I’m not sure how many will read all of this. Maybe some will read the first few paragraphs and get bored, or others won’t read it at all. But I hope that the one I want to read it will.

Don’t you know you’re beautiful

If you feel you are worthless
because of the words of others,
remember that those words are older than you.
They’ve been traveling for some time now.
You are not their first stop,
and you aren’t their last.

Forgiveness and Forgetting

Forgiveness is not the act of
Forgetting what they did.
It’s not for them to feel better,
Nor is it an obligation.
Forgiveness is the act of letting go
Of the pain, they caused so that
You can move on and blossom into the
Butterfly you are.

And now I want you to think of every single person who has ever hurt you. What did they say? How did it make you feel? And now ask yourself, who are they to you?

Picture Via National Geographic Kids.

Remembrance by Lauren M.

When I think about you I can’t breathe
I swear that for a moment,
just a moment,
the world freezes.
There’s nothing but me
In my red lipstick and long dress.
Then there’s you.
A Prince charming to my fairytale.
In my head, I can feel the touch of our hands
as they glide over each other’s skin.
I feel your lips on mine.
They’re on my cheek, my neck, my shoulders.
I still remember what it was like to touch your hair.
It blanketed my fingers like it was trying to keep them warm.
The memories are vague, so long ago.
It’s like trying to create a character for a book.
You’re real, but you aren’t.
I’m trying to know someone who I’ve never met.
It frightens me to try,
but scares me to forget.

Lauren M.

Image via Business Insider

The Heart Of Poetry

Poetry is a form of writing that most people don’t pay attention to. Even those who read the biggest books won’t pick up a small poem. It seems meaningless to them compared to the adventures of their novels. I’ve been that way for most of my life. Always reading and appreciating literature, but never reveling in the beauty of poetry.

“And when wind and winter harden / All the loveless land, / It will whisper of the garden, / You will understand.” – To My Wife, Oscar Wilde

I think the reason is school. Every year the English class curriculums require poetry. There are guides, big words, and a formula for creating the perfect poem. However, I’ve come to find out that poetry isn’t perfect and there isn’t this perfect formula for it. While personification, metaphors, and similes are great you don’t need them for a poem to be good.

Personally, I prefer personification. In my opinion, it’s always been easier to make an inanimate object come to life. “The smiling sun,” and, “Caressing towel,” are just two examples. Before yesterday, I hadn’t written poetry in a long time. In fact, the last time I remember writing a poem was with my sister one night. I don’t remember what I wrote about, but I used one of her prompts from her class.

“Words, words were truly alive on the tongue, in the head warm, beating, frantic, winged; music and blood but then I was young.” – “Little Red Cap” by Carol Ann Duffy

All I remember was that it needed to make me mad and uncomfortable. It was then I learned that poetry is uncomfortable. It’s not like writing a novel where you can be someone different from yourself. In poetry, you are yourself. You can’t hide behind a mask or pretend that it isn’t how you really feel. It is pure, raw emotion and intimacy. It’s passion and everything about your life that you love and hate.

Before that night, I hadn’t written since I was with one of my ex-boyfriends. I’d thought that I’d lost my ability to write poetry because he’d left me so empty. I also thought that I wasn’t good at it. (I’m definitely no Emily Dickenson). However, you don’t need to be an Emily Dickenson to move someone with your words.

Robert Frost once said, “Poetry begins with a lump in the throat.” It’s what you feel and it’s your chance to release those thoughts on paper. It’s a great outlet, especially if you can’t find the words verbally.